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WT Afternoon Course [clear filter]
Wednesday, August 1
 

1:30pm

WT03 Pre- and Post-Publication Peer Review: Perspectives and Platforms
MT3 and WT3 Pre- and Post-Publication Peer Review: Perspectives and Platforms
Course Chairs: John Hilton, Editor, Cochrane, London
Instructor: John Hilton, Editor, Cochrane, London

Peer review is an established and much debated part of scholarly communication, with differing models and challenges across disciplines and publishing venues. Post-publication peer review and commenting represent a more diverse, more dispersed and less “essential” set of activities that nonetheless reflect a fundamental element of scholarship. With the growth of preprint servers and intermediary platforms and services, the lines between “pre” and “post” are blurred.
This course will take a broad view of peer review and commenting, considering them as interventions and systems. What is their purpose? Who are they for? Who do they benefit? What are the incentives and disincentives? Can post-publication peer review thrive, or is it “simply unrealistic to expect informed, well-argued opinions from those who have not been specifically tasked with the job of supplying them”? (Nancy McCormack, Law Library Journal, 2009).
The course will also survey flaws and imbalances in peer review and commenting models and processes, addressing challenges such as bias, fraud, anonymity and personal attacks. Participants will also take a tour through innovations and research in this area, seeing how they relate to the broader world of scholarly communication. Finally, the course will explore how scholars, editors and others can engage most effectively with peer review and commenting systems to achieve the most desirable outcomes for scholarship.

Instructor | Speaker
avatar for John Hilton

John Hilton

Editor, Cochrane Editorial Unit, Cochrane


Wednesday August 1, 2018 1:30pm - 4:30pm
BLB: Classroom 4

1:30pm

WT04 Detection of Questionable Publishing Practices: Procedures, Key Elements and Practical Examples
MT4 and WT4 Detection of Questionable Publishing Practices: Procedures, Key Elements and Practical Examples
Course Chairs: Tom Olijhoek, PhD, Editor in Chief, Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ), Netherlands
Instructor: Tom Olijhoek, PhD, Editor in Chief, Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ), Netherlands; Ivonne Lujano, DOAJ Ambassador for Latin America

Description: On Day 1 of the course, we will first explain in detail the criteria used by the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ) for assessment of good publishing practice in Open Access publishing. These criteria have been accepted as de facto standards for good publishing practice by many governments and organizations, including Science Europe.
We will have a practical session where participants evaluate journals using the DOAJ quality criteria. Criteria most important for the detection of questionable publishing practices will be discussed. Among these are peer review practices and how to check these, editorial board quality and article quality.
With the aid of figures and maps from the existing literature, we will highlight the geographical and numerical distribution of questionable publishing. We will also put the problem into perspective by providing evidence that questionable publishing is especially a problem in the Global South, and we will show that the overall problem is usually very much exaggerated in existing publications and reports on the subject.
 n addition, we will show that the existing scholarly publishing system, inclusive of Open Access, is markedly biased in a kind of neocolonial way toward publishing research from the Global North. Policy makers in the Global South also tend to prefer publications in journals listed in Web of Science and Scopus (mostly from the North). All of this makes it difficult for scholars in the Global South to publish in local journals or to publish on local knowledge.
On Day 2, the course will offer a detailed look at properties of questionable publishing using practical examples from different regions of the world.
In a second practical session, participants will form groups and evaluate  a number of suspicious journals with the aid of a checklist that we will provide. The findings will be discussed, and new detection criteria may emerge from this exercise.
The last part of the course will investigate, with the help of participants, how detection methods may be standardized and even partly automated with specific software implementations

Instructor | Speaker
avatar for Ivonne Lujano

Ivonne Lujano

Directory of Open Access Journals, Universidad Autónoma del Estado de México
Soy una académica especializada en procesos editoriales científicos de Acceso Abierto. Cuento con más de siete años de experiencia en gestión, implementación y evaluación de medios editoriales científicos, tanto de divulgación como especializados. He colaborado con instituciones... Read More →
avatar for Tom Olyhoek

Tom Olyhoek

Editor in Chief, Directory of Open Access Journals
I am a molecular microbiology researcher with ampel living and working experience in Europe and Africa. I have done research on tropical and exotic diseases like malaria, sleeping sickness and Lyme disease. Since 2012 I work on advocacy for open science and open access with OKF and... Read More →


Wednesday August 1, 2018 1:30pm - 4:30pm
Skaggs:1182

1:30pm

WT05 Open Data Visualization: Tools and Techniques to Better Report Data
MT5 and WT5 Open Data Visualization: Tools and Techniques to Better Report Data
Course Chairs: Gaurav Godhwani, Technical Lead and Advisor, Centre for Budget and Governance Accountability (CBGA India) and Chapter Leader, DataKind Bangalore
Instructor: Gaurav Godhwani, Technical Lead and Advisor, Centre for Budget and Governance Accountability (CBGA India) and Chapter Leader, DataKind Bangalore

Description: There is an increasing need among the research community to make data and research more accessible and easier to understand. This is bringing a tactical shift in the way researchers communicate their data and its relationships. The emerging styles of charts, tables, graphics and visuals are changing the course of how data visualizations explain research and its context. In this session, we will explore some simple open-source tools and design techniques to create interactive data visualizations so participants can better report their data and analysis. We will draw a parallel from the tech and media world to determine if some of these data visualization techniques can be applied in scholarly communications.
This course will have two components:
The first part will offer a detailed introduction to a few existing techniques of data visualization along with an overview of various data visualization tools, which researchers can easily adopt in their work cycle.
The second part will dive into a hands-on experience of visualizing a few datasets. Participants are encouraged to bring their own datasets or pick a few from the samples designed for the session. We will divide into groups to build, iterate and refine a few interesting data visualizations and stories.
Prop

Instructor | Speaker
avatar for Gaurav Godhwani

Gaurav Godhwani

Director & Co-founder, CivicDataLab
Gaurav leads work at CivicDataLab, harnessing Data, Tech, Design and Social Science to strengthen the course of Civic Engagements in India. Gaurav has been focusing his energy to develop & strengthen data-for-good ecosystem in India, he has been instrumental in starting initiatives... Read More →


Wednesday August 1, 2018 1:30pm - 4:30pm
Skaggs:1160

1:30pm

WT06 Public Humanities as Scholarly Communication
MT6 and WT6 Public Humanities as Scholarly Communication
Course Chairs: Micah Vandegrift, Open Knowledge Librarian, North Carolina State University Libraries
Instructor: Micah Vandegrift, Open Knowledge Librarian, North Carolina State University Libraries; Samantha Wallace, PhD candidate in English, University of Virginia, and affiliate with Public Humanities Lab, Institute of the Humanities and Global Cultures

Description: Conversations about the humanities and scholarly communication tend to focus on the evolution of the monograph through digital publishing platforms and tools; on why Open Access applies in the humanistic disciplines (or why it does not); or on how digital humanities are the bridge to an open future. This course will focus instead on exploring Public Humanities as a possible method and model for advancing scholarly communication across the humanities. Establishing a dialogue between Open Access and the Public Humanities will encourage a re-evaluation of what counts as meaningful scholarly communication.
Topics of  discussion may include:
  • How does the “open” of Open Access interact with the “public” of Public Humanities? What are the conceptual and practical overlaps between them? How can we interrogate these two terms by putting them in conversation with each other?
  • What is the relationship between Public Humanities and new directions in scholarly communication?
  • How do media and target audiences interact to shape the production of scholarship?
  • How can scholars, especially early-career researchers seeking tenure, receive professional recognition for their work in the Public Humanities or other nontraditional forms of work?
  • Can we draw a line between scholarly communication, Public Humanities and Open Access, and then advocate for them as important criteria for scholarship worthy of institutional support?
The two three-hour sessions will be broken down into several sections in order to:
  1. allow the participants to choose a framing topic, a list of which will be supplied by the instructors with attendant brief readings/resources;
  2. examine the topic through participants’ expertise and experiences (shared discussion);
  3. break out into small groups for hands-on brainstorming (for example: design thinking, think-pair-share, etc.);
  4. reconvene to combine our efforts into actionable directions, which could take the form of a white paper, position statement, manifesto, toolkit or some other utility.
The first day of the course will focus loosely on defining and exploring the field/concept/idea of Public Humanities. On Day 2, we will tie that to new methods in scholarly communication.
We aim in this course to collaboratively tackle a challenging topic and to push our community toward seeing that challenge in a new light

Instructor | Speaker
avatar for Micah Vandegrift

Micah Vandegrift

Open Knowledge Librarian, North Carolina State University
Open. BBQ.
avatar for Samantha Wallace

Samantha Wallace

PhD candidate in English and affiliate with Public Humanities Lab, University of Virginia / Institute of the Humanities and Global Cultures
Samantha Wallace completed her undergraduate degree in English and Classics at Colorado College in 2011, and then a post-baccalaureate degree in Classics at the University of California, Los Angeles, in 2012. Before coming to the University of Virginia she was involved with art education... Read More →


Wednesday August 1, 2018 1:30pm - 4:30pm
Skaggs:1186

1:30pm

WT07 Integrating Wikidata with Your Educational Workflows
WT7 Integrating Wikidata with Your Educational Workflows (Part 2)
Course Chairs: Daniel Mietchen, PhD, Data Scientist, University of Virginia
Instructor: Daniel Mietchen, PhD, Data Scientist, University of Virginia. Members of the Wikimedia community will contribute to the course.

For background on Wikidata, see the MT7 course description. While MT7 is about the roles of Wikidata in research and curation, WT7 is focused on its roles around education. Both sessions will have an introductory part about Wikidata, and participants of MT7 will lead this introduction for the WT7 course.
Wikidata is an open educational resource of growing importance, but it has not found its way into many curricula, nor has curriculum-related information found its way into Wikidata at scale. In this session, we want to explore both of these avenues for interaction between the platform and educational workflows.
On the one hand, we will consider which options there are to enrich curricula with Wikidata-related activities. We will outline three main approaches to this and provide examples of attempts to implement them:
  • Building generic Wikidata-based modules that can be inserted into coursework on a broad range of subjects with minimal customization.
  • Adding a Wikidata component to existing courses that involve Wikipedia or some other Wikimedia-related activity.
  • Building a largely Wikidata-based curriculum for data science or other data-centric fields.
In addition, we will explore how the indexing of curricula, syllabi and related information in Wikidata or Wikidata-federated Wikibase instances can be used to help instructors, students, administrators and others find information related to courses or curricula in their fields of interests.
While the focus of the session will be on tertiary education, perspectives from other educational contexts (such as secondary education, continuing professional development or language training) will be included as well.
The course consists of two parts. The first afternoon will
  • provide an introduction to Wikimedia projects like Wikipedia, Wikimedia Commons, Wikisource and Wikidata.
  • zoom in on Wikidata and on ways in which it can be used in educational contexts and to collect and curate education-related information.
  • The second afternoon will focus on participants contributing or otherwise curating some education-related Wikidata content in their domains and languages of choice;
  • explore how various aspects of Wikidata (such as Wikidata identifiers, APIs, SPARQL endpoint, multilinguality, the Wikibase software, apps and tools) can be integrated with education-related workflows, drawing on scenarios provided by course participants.
The course will be taught on the basis of materials provided at https://www.wikidata.org/wiki/User:Daniel_Mietchen/FSCI_2018
While MT7 is about the roles of Wikidata in research and curation, WT7 is focused on its roles around education. Both sessions will have an introductory part about Wikidata, and participants of MT7 who also attend WT7 will lead this introduction for the WT7 course.

Instructor | Speaker
avatar for Daniel Mietchen

Daniel Mietchen

Researcher/Scholar/Scientist, Data Science Institute, University of Virginia
- Integrating research workflows with the Web - Engaging the research community and the public with open research workflows - Using open research workflows in educational contexts


Wednesday August 1, 2018 1:30pm - 4:30pm
TBA

1:30pm

WT08 Walking the Walk: Promoting and Maintaining Best Practices in Fair and Open Evaluation
WT8 Walking the Walk: Promoting and Maintaining Best Practices in Fair and Open Evaluation
Course Chairs: Stefan Tanaka, PhD, Professor of Communication, UC San Diego
Instructors: Stefan Tanaka, PhD, Professor of Communication, UC San Diego; Daniel O'Donnell, PhD, Professor of English, University of Lethbridge, Canada; Allegra Swift, Scholarly Communications Librarian, UC San Diego

As we are building tools, changing infrastructure, and creating new ways to disseminate and share scholarly output, we have been less focused one of the most difficult (because it is cultural) issues – the institutional reward and recognition system, including policies and practices regarding merit, promotion and tenure.
Current systems of evaluation and reporting remain entrenched in ages-old practices while falling further behind advances in scholarship, research methods, publication, impact measurement and reporting. Often uncertainty and misinformation are circulated through evaluators and the evaluated alike, and barriers to the evolution of scholarly communication make it more difficult to entice and retain the best and the brightest.
This course will unpack current practices. It will discuss official university requirements, examine best-practice statements of various disciplines, compare the varied application of these policies and explore strategies for updating promotion practices

Instructor | Speaker
avatar for Daniel Paul O'Donnell

Daniel Paul O'Donnell

Professor, University of Lethbridge
Daniel O'Donnell is a professor at the University of Lethbridge where he teaches Digital Humanities, Old English, and Medieval Literature. He is founding chair of Global Outlook Digital Humanities, Editor-in-chief of Digital Humanities / Le Champ Numérique, and PI of the Visionary... Read More →
avatar for Allegra Swift

Allegra Swift

Scholarly Communication Librarian, UCSD
I support researchers and scholars at UC San Diego from all backgrounds, disciplines, and at all career stages to use, create, and publish scholarship and research in ways that promote its dissemination, accessibility, and impact.I offer guidance so that our academic community can... Read More →
ST

Stefan Tanaka

Researcher/Scholar/Scientist, UCSD


Wednesday August 1, 2018 1:30pm - 4:30pm
BLB: Events Room

1:30pm

WT09 Implementing Software Citation
WT9 Implementing Software Citation
Course Chairs: Daniel S. Katz, PhD, Assistant Director for Scientific Software and Applications, National Center for Supercomputing Applications and Research; and Research Associate Professor in Information Sciences, Computer Science, and Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign
Instructor: Daniel S. Katz, PhD, Assistant Director for Scientific Software and Applications, National Center for Supercomputing Applications and Research; and Research Associate Professor in Information Sciences, Computer Science, and Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

Description: The course will be a combination of lecture, discussion, and exercises. It will present the case for software citation and introduce the Software Citation Principles (https://doi.org/10.7717/peerj-cs.86), along with more recent developments in the field. We will discuss what benefits and challenges participants see in using the principles.
Participants will then assume a variety of roles (software developer, software user, funder, publisher, archivist/librarian, university administrator, or science historian) and test how the principles help them in that role and what the consequences to the researcher are. Because the principles are high-level, the exact way they are applied can vary widely, but some standard practices seem likely to emerge, and the role-playing exercises will help illustrate those practices. As part of the course, participants will have the opportunity to prepare software they have co-authored for software citation, and they will cite software using their preferred tool.
At the end of the course, participants will be able to apply the principles in their work and to explain to others why they should apply the principles, too. In cases where there are problems in applying the principles, participants should completely understand why and what changes need to be made

Instructor | Speaker
avatar for Daniel S. Katz

Daniel S. Katz

Assistant Dir. for Scientific Software & Applications, NCSA; Research Assoc. Prof., CS, ECE, iSchool, University of Illinois at Champaign-Urbana


Wednesday August 1, 2018 1:30pm - 4:30pm
MET:204

1:30pm

WT10 Mentoring the Next Generation of Open Scholars: Approaches, Tools and Tactics
WT10 Mentoring the Next Generation of Open Scholars: Approaches, Tools and Tactics
Course Chairs: Robyn Hall, Scholarly Communications Librarian, MacEwan University, Edmonton, Canada
Instructor: Robyn Hall, Scholarly Communications Librarian, MacEwan University, Edmonton, Canada

Description: Those who teach and supervise students can play an important role in shaping the future of scholarly communications. Drawing students’ attention to the myriad of ways that research and scholarship can be shared openly online can provide valuable opportunities for students to disseminate their own work, engage with the work of others, and develop copyright literacy and improved academic writing and communication skills. Additionally, exposing students to the socioeconomic processes that shape access to knowledge can influence where these budding academics choose to publish and how they approach scholarly activity overall in their future careers.
On Day 1 of this course, participants will be asked to reflect upon their own early experiences with scholarly communications as students and how these experiences have shaped their professional values and practices concerning both teaching and research. As a group, we will then explore and discuss a variety of assignment designs and initiatives from across disciplines where instructors have mentored and involved students in areas of scholarly communications and open research, and review some easy-to-use, free software options and platforms that can facilitate these activities.
On Day 2, participants will have the opportunity to begin building their own assignment, initiative or lesson plan that aims to engage students in open practices and educate them on scholarly communications topics and issues. By the end of this course, participants will have constructed a comprehensive and actionable plan to involve the students that they teach or supervise with open research practices that will both benefit student learning presently and contribute positively to the future of academic publishing and research dissemination

Instructor | Speaker
avatar for Robyn Hall

Robyn Hall

Scholarly Communications Librarian, MacEwan University


Wednesday August 1, 2018 1:30pm - 4:30pm
MET:225

1:30pm

WT11 Structural Biology: A Prototypical Case for Publishing Big Data
WT11 Structural Biology: A Prototypical Case for Publishing Big Data
Course Chairs: Gustavo Durand, Technical Lead/Architect, Dataverse, The Institute for Quantitative Social Science, Harvard University
Instructor: Gustavo DurandTechnical Lead/Architect, Dataverse, The Institute for Quantitative Social Science, Harvard University; Pete Meyers, PhD, Research Computing Specialist, SBGrid Consortium, Harvard Medical School
Course Syllabus
Description: The general public, funding agencies and researchers are increasingly recognizing the significance of publishing biomedical research data. This process can improve research efficiency, and it is essential for reproducibility and validation of scientific research.
However, the characteristics of these datasets can present problems when it comes to  publishing them in a manner that is easily usable, citable and verifiable. In particular, biomedical datasets can require significant amounts of storage; can comprise several hundred to several thousand files; and need to be accessible to automated validation pipelines at multiple storage locations. The process of depositing, publishing and verifying datasets needs to be as efficient as possible for researchers operating under time and effort constraints.
This course will explore some of the currently existing platforms, from domain-specific repositories in structural biology and how they handle data deposition and validation to more general-purpose repositories and how they have shown to be a poor fit. We will discuss the students’ own experiences and also see if these problems are shared with other domains.
The course will then explore recent enhancements made to Dataverse, a data repository framework to share and publish research data, in order to support these processes. These enhancements include depositing big datasets comprising tens to hundreds of gigabytes, ensuring the integrity of these datasets via checksum algorithms and replicating datasets close to compute resources.
The instructors will also address how design decisions made during this process could impact use in other domains. Lastly, the class will discuss what big-data repositories of the future should look like.
The course will combine lectures and hands-on work to walk participants through the process of depositing and publishing datasets with this framework. At the end of this course, each participant should have a clear understanding of the benefits and pitfalls of working with big data and direct user experience with Dataverse’s approach to addressing these challenges.

Instructor | Speaker
avatar for Gustavo Durand

Gustavo Durand

Dataverse Technical Lead, Harvard University
PM

Pete Meyers, PhD

Research Computing Specialist, Harvard Medical School - SBGrid Consortium


Wednesday August 1, 2018 1:30pm - 4:30pm
MET:313
 
Thursday, August 2
 

1:30pm

WT03 Pre- and Post-Publication Peer Review: Perspectives and Platforms
MT3 and WT3 Pre- and Post-Publication Peer Review: Perspectives and Platforms
Course Chairs: John Hilton, Editor, Cochrane, London
Instructor: John Hilton, Editor, Cochrane, London

Peer review is an established and much debated part of scholarly communication, with differing models and challenges across disciplines and publishing venues. Post-publication peer review and commenting represent a more diverse, more dispersed and less “essential” set of activities that nonetheless reflect a fundamental element of scholarship. With the growth of preprint servers and intermediary platforms and services, the lines between “pre” and “post” are blurred.
This course will take a broad view of peer review and commenting, considering them as interventions and systems. What is their purpose? Who are they for? Who do they benefit? What are the incentives and disincentives? Can post-publication peer review thrive, or is it “simply unrealistic to expect informed, well-argued opinions from those who have not been specifically tasked with the job of supplying them”? (Nancy McCormack, Law Library Journal, 2009).
The course will also survey flaws and imbalances in peer review and commenting models and processes, addressing challenges such as bias, fraud, anonymity and personal attacks. Participants will also take a tour through innovations and research in this area, seeing how they relate to the broader world of scholarly communication. Finally, the course will explore how scholars, editors and others can engage most effectively with peer review and commenting systems to achieve the most desirable outcomes for scholarship.

Instructor | Speaker
avatar for John Hilton

John Hilton

Editor, Cochrane Editorial Unit, Cochrane


Thursday August 2, 2018 1:30pm - 4:30pm
BLB: Classroom 4

1:30pm

WT04 Detection of Questionable Publishing Practices: Procedures, Key Elements and Practical Examples
MT4 and WT4 Detection of Questionable Publishing Practices: Procedures, Key Elements and Practical Examples
Course Chairs: Tom Olijhoek, PhD, Editor in Chief, Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ), Netherlands
Instructor: Tom Olijhoek, PhD, Editor in Chief, Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ), Netherlands; Ivonne Lujano, DOAJ Ambassador for Latin America

Description: On Day 1 of the course, we will first explain in detail the criteria used by the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ) for assessment of good publishing practice in Open Access publishing. These criteria have been accepted as de facto standards for good publishing practice by many governments and organizations, including Science Europe.
We will have a practical session where participants evaluate journals using the DOAJ quality criteria. Criteria most important for the detection of questionable publishing practices will be discussed. Among these are peer review practices and how to check these, editorial board quality and article quality.
With the aid of figures and maps from the existing literature, we will highlight the geographical and numerical distribution of questionable publishing. We will also put the problem into perspective by providing evidence that questionable publishing is especially a problem in the Global South, and we will show that the overall problem is usually very much exaggerated in existing publications and reports on the subject.
 n addition, we will show that the existing scholarly publishing system, inclusive of Open Access, is markedly biased in a kind of neocolonial way toward publishing research from the Global North. Policy makers in the Global South also tend to prefer publications in journals listed in Web of Science and Scopus (mostly from the North). All of this makes it difficult for scholars in the Global South to publish in local journals or to publish on local knowledge.
On Day 2, the course will offer a detailed look at properties of questionable publishing using practical examples from different regions of the world.
In a second practical session, participants will form groups and evaluate  a number of suspicious journals with the aid of a checklist that we will provide. The findings will be discussed, and new detection criteria may emerge from this exercise.
The last part of the course will investigate, with the help of participants, how detection methods may be standardized and even partly automated with specific software implementations

Instructor | Speaker
avatar for Ivonne Lujano

Ivonne Lujano

Directory of Open Access Journals, Universidad Autónoma del Estado de México
Soy una académica especializada en procesos editoriales científicos de Acceso Abierto. Cuento con más de siete años de experiencia en gestión, implementación y evaluación de medios editoriales científicos, tanto de divulgación como especializados. He colaborado con instituciones... Read More →
avatar for Tom Olyhoek

Tom Olyhoek

Editor in Chief, Directory of Open Access Journals
I am a molecular microbiology researcher with ampel living and working experience in Europe and Africa. I have done research on tropical and exotic diseases like malaria, sleeping sickness and Lyme disease. Since 2012 I work on advocacy for open science and open access with OKF and... Read More →


Thursday August 2, 2018 1:30pm - 4:30pm
Skaggs:1182

1:30pm

WT05 Open Data Visualization: Tools and Techniques to Better Report Data
MT5 and WT5 Open Data Visualization: Tools and Techniques to Better Report Data
Course Chairs: Gaurav Godhwani, Technical Lead and Advisor, Centre for Budget and Governance Accountability (CBGA India) and Chapter Leader, DataKind Bangalore
Instructor: Gaurav Godhwani, Technical Lead and Advisor, Centre for Budget and Governance Accountability (CBGA India) and Chapter Leader, DataKind Bangalore

Description: There is an increasing need among the research community to make data and research more accessible and easier to understand. This is bringing a tactical shift in the way researchers communicate their data and its relationships. The emerging styles of charts, tables, graphics and visuals are changing the course of how data visualizations explain research and its context. In this session, we will explore some simple open-source tools and design techniques to create interactive data visualizations so participants can better report their data and analysis. We will draw a parallel from the tech and media world to determine if some of these data visualization techniques can be applied in scholarly communications.
This course will have two components:
The first part will offer a detailed introduction to a few existing techniques of data visualization along with an overview of various data visualization tools, which researchers can easily adopt in their work cycle.
The second part will dive into a hands-on experience of visualizing a few datasets. Participants are encouraged to bring their own datasets or pick a few from the samples designed for the session. We will divide into groups to build, iterate and refine a few interesting data visualizations and stories.
Prop

Instructor | Speaker
avatar for Gaurav Godhwani

Gaurav Godhwani

Director & Co-founder, CivicDataLab
Gaurav leads work at CivicDataLab, harnessing Data, Tech, Design and Social Science to strengthen the course of Civic Engagements in India. Gaurav has been focusing his energy to develop & strengthen data-for-good ecosystem in India, he has been instrumental in starting initiatives... Read More →


Thursday August 2, 2018 1:30pm - 4:30pm
Skaggs:1160

1:30pm

WT06 Public Humanities as Scholarly Communication
MT6 and WT6 Public Humanities as Scholarly Communication
Course Chairs: Micah Vandegrift, Open Knowledge Librarian, North Carolina State University Libraries
Instructor: Micah Vandegrift, Open Knowledge Librarian, North Carolina State University Libraries; Samantha Wallace, PhD candidate in English, University of Virginia, and affiliate with Public Humanities Lab, Institute of the Humanities and Global Cultures

Description: Conversations about the humanities and scholarly communication tend to focus on the evolution of the monograph through digital publishing platforms and tools; on why Open Access applies in the humanistic disciplines (or why it does not); or on how digital humanities are the bridge to an open future. This course will focus instead on exploring Public Humanities as a possible method and model for advancing scholarly communication across the humanities. Establishing a dialogue between Open Access and the Public Humanities will encourage a re-evaluation of what counts as meaningful scholarly communication.
Topics of  discussion may include:
  • How does the “open” of Open Access interact with the “public” of Public Humanities? What are the conceptual and practical overlaps between them? How can we interrogate these two terms by putting them in conversation with each other?
  • What is the relationship between Public Humanities and new directions in scholarly communication?
  • How do media and target audiences interact to shape the production of scholarship?
  • How can scholars, especially early-career researchers seeking tenure, receive professional recognition for their work in the Public Humanities or other nontraditional forms of work?
  • Can we draw a line between scholarly communication, Public Humanities and Open Access, and then advocate for them as important criteria for scholarship worthy of institutional support?
The two three-hour sessions will be broken down into several sections in order to:
  1. allow the participants to choose a framing topic, a list of which will be supplied by the instructors with attendant brief readings/resources;
  2. examine the topic through participants’ expertise and experiences (shared discussion);
  3. break out into small groups for hands-on brainstorming (for example: design thinking, think-pair-share, etc.);
  4. reconvene to combine our efforts into actionable directions, which could take the form of a white paper, position statement, manifesto, toolkit or some other utility.
The first day of the course will focus loosely on defining and exploring the field/concept/idea of Public Humanities. On Day 2, we will tie that to new methods in scholarly communication.
We aim in this course to collaboratively tackle a challenging topic and to push our community toward seeing that challenge in a new light

Instructor | Speaker
avatar for Micah Vandegrift

Micah Vandegrift

Open Knowledge Librarian, North Carolina State University
Open. BBQ.
avatar for Samantha Wallace

Samantha Wallace

PhD candidate in English and affiliate with Public Humanities Lab, University of Virginia / Institute of the Humanities and Global Cultures
Samantha Wallace completed her undergraduate degree in English and Classics at Colorado College in 2011, and then a post-baccalaureate degree in Classics at the University of California, Los Angeles, in 2012. Before coming to the University of Virginia she was involved with art education... Read More →


Thursday August 2, 2018 1:30pm - 4:30pm
Skaggs:1186

1:30pm

WT07 Integrating Wikidata with Your Educational Workflows
WT7 Integrating Wikidata with Your Educational Workflows (Part 2)
Course Chairs: Daniel Mietchen, PhD, Data Scientist, University of Virginia
Instructor: Daniel Mietchen, PhD, Data Scientist, University of Virginia. Members of the Wikimedia community will contribute to the course.

For background on Wikidata, see the MT7 course description. While MT7 is about the roles of Wikidata in research and curation, WT7 is focused on its roles around education. Both sessions will have an introductory part about Wikidata, and participants of MT7 will lead this introduction for the WT7 course.
Wikidata is an open educational resource of growing importance, but it has not found its way into many curricula, nor has curriculum-related information found its way into Wikidata at scale. In this session, we want to explore both of these avenues for interaction between the platform and educational workflows.
On the one hand, we will consider which options there are to enrich curricula with Wikidata-related activities. We will outline three main approaches to this and provide examples of attempts to implement them:
  • Building generic Wikidata-based modules that can be inserted into coursework on a broad range of subjects with minimal customization.
  • Adding a Wikidata component to existing courses that involve Wikipedia or some other Wikimedia-related activity.
  • Building a largely Wikidata-based curriculum for data science or other data-centric fields.
In addition, we will explore how the indexing of curricula, syllabi and related information in Wikidata or Wikidata-federated Wikibase instances can be used to help instructors, students, administrators and others find information related to courses or curricula in their fields of interests.
While the focus of the session will be on tertiary education, perspectives from other educational contexts (such as secondary education, continuing professional development or language training) will be included as well.
The course consists of two parts. The first afternoon will
  • provide an introduction to Wikimedia projects like Wikipedia, Wikimedia Commons, Wikisource and Wikidata.
  • zoom in on Wikidata and on ways in which it can be used in educational contexts and to collect and curate education-related information.
  • The second afternoon will focus on participants contributing or otherwise curating some education-related Wikidata content in their domains and languages of choice;
  • explore how various aspects of Wikidata (such as Wikidata identifiers, APIs, SPARQL endpoint, multilinguality, the Wikibase software, apps and tools) can be integrated with education-related workflows, drawing on scenarios provided by course participants.
The course will be taught on the basis of materials provided at https://www.wikidata.org/wiki/User:Daniel_Mietchen/FSCI_2018
While MT7 is about the roles of Wikidata in research and curation, WT7 is focused on its roles around education. Both sessions will have an introductory part about Wikidata, and participants of MT7 who also attend WT7 will lead this introduction for the WT7 course.

Instructor | Speaker
avatar for Daniel Mietchen

Daniel Mietchen

Researcher/Scholar/Scientist, Data Science Institute, University of Virginia
- Integrating research workflows with the Web - Engaging the research community and the public with open research workflows - Using open research workflows in educational contexts


Thursday August 2, 2018 1:30pm - 4:30pm
BLB: Classroom 3

1:30pm

WT08 Walking the Walk: Promoting and Maintaining Best Practices in Fair and Open Evaluation
WT8 Walking the Walk: Promoting and Maintaining Best Practices in Fair and Open Evaluation
Course Chairs: Stefan Tanaka, PhD, Professor of Communication, UC San Diego
Instructors: Stefan Tanaka, PhD, Professor of Communication, UC San Diego; Daniel O'Donnell, PhD, Professor of English, University of Lethbridge, Canada; Allegra Swift, Scholarly Communications Librarian, UC San Diego

As we are building tools, changing infrastructure, and creating new ways to disseminate and share scholarly output, we have been less focused one of the most difficult (because it is cultural) issues – the institutional reward and recognition system, including policies and practices regarding merit, promotion and tenure.
Current systems of evaluation and reporting remain entrenched in ages-old practices while falling further behind advances in scholarship, research methods, publication, impact measurement and reporting. Often uncertainty and misinformation are circulated through evaluators and the evaluated alike, and barriers to the evolution of scholarly communication make it more difficult to entice and retain the best and the brightest.
This course will unpack current practices. It will discuss official university requirements, examine best-practice statements of various disciplines, compare the varied application of these policies and explore strategies for updating promotion practices

Instructor | Speaker
avatar for Daniel Paul O'Donnell

Daniel Paul O'Donnell

Professor, University of Lethbridge
Daniel O'Donnell is a professor at the University of Lethbridge where he teaches Digital Humanities, Old English, and Medieval Literature. He is founding chair of Global Outlook Digital Humanities, Editor-in-chief of Digital Humanities / Le Champ Numérique, and PI of the Visionary... Read More →
avatar for Allegra Swift

Allegra Swift

Scholarly Communication Librarian, UCSD
I support researchers and scholars at UC San Diego from all backgrounds, disciplines, and at all career stages to use, create, and publish scholarship and research in ways that promote its dissemination, accessibility, and impact.I offer guidance so that our academic community can... Read More →
ST

Stefan Tanaka

Researcher/Scholar/Scientist, UCSD


Thursday August 2, 2018 1:30pm - 4:30pm
BLB: Events Room

1:30pm

WT09 Implementing Software Citation
WT9 Implementing Software Citation
Course Chairs: Daniel S. Katz, PhD, Assistant Director for Scientific Software and Applications, National Center for Supercomputing Applications and Research; and Research Associate Professor in Information Sciences, Computer Science, and Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign
Instructor: Daniel S. Katz, PhD, Assistant Director for Scientific Software and Applications, National Center for Supercomputing Applications and Research; and Research Associate Professor in Information Sciences, Computer Science, and Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

Description: The course will be a combination of lecture, discussion, and exercises. It will present the case for software citation and introduce the Software Citation Principles (https://doi.org/10.7717/peerj-cs.86), along with more recent developments in the field. We will discuss what benefits and challenges participants see in using the principles.
Participants will then assume a variety of roles (software developer, software user, funder, publisher, archivist/librarian, university administrator, or science historian) and test how the principles help them in that role and what the consequences to the researcher are. Because the principles are high-level, the exact way they are applied can vary widely, but some standard practices seem likely to emerge, and the role-playing exercises will help illustrate those practices. As part of the course, participants will have the opportunity to prepare software they have co-authored for software citation, and they will cite software using their preferred tool.
At the end of the course, participants will be able to apply the principles in their work and to explain to others why they should apply the principles, too. In cases where there are problems in applying the principles, participants should completely understand why and what changes need to be made

Instructor | Speaker
avatar for Daniel S. Katz

Daniel S. Katz

Assistant Dir. for Scientific Software & Applications, NCSA; Research Assoc. Prof., CS, ECE, iSchool, University of Illinois at Champaign-Urbana


Thursday August 2, 2018 1:30pm - 4:30pm
MET:204

1:30pm

WT10 Mentoring the Next Generation of Open Scholars: Approaches, Tools and Tactics
WT10 Mentoring the Next Generation of Open Scholars: Approaches, Tools and Tactics
Course Chairs: Robyn Hall, Scholarly Communications Librarian, MacEwan University, Edmonton, Canada
Instructor: Robyn Hall, Scholarly Communications Librarian, MacEwan University, Edmonton, Canada

Description: Those who teach and supervise students can play an important role in shaping the future of scholarly communications. Drawing students’ attention to the myriad of ways that research and scholarship can be shared openly online can provide valuable opportunities for students to disseminate their own work, engage with the work of others, and develop copyright literacy and improved academic writing and communication skills. Additionally, exposing students to the socioeconomic processes that shape access to knowledge can influence where these budding academics choose to publish and how they approach scholarly activity overall in their future careers.
On Day 1 of this course, participants will be asked to reflect upon their own early experiences with scholarly communications as students and how these experiences have shaped their professional values and practices concerning both teaching and research. As a group, we will then explore and discuss a variety of assignment designs and initiatives from across disciplines where instructors have mentored and involved students in areas of scholarly communications and open research, and review some easy-to-use, free software options and platforms that can facilitate these activities.
On Day 2, participants will have the opportunity to begin building their own assignment, initiative or lesson plan that aims to engage students in open practices and educate them on scholarly communications topics and issues. By the end of this course, participants will have constructed a comprehensive and actionable plan to involve the students that they teach or supervise with open research practices that will both benefit student learning presently and contribute positively to the future of academic publishing and research dissemination

Instructor | Speaker
avatar for Robyn Hall

Robyn Hall

Scholarly Communications Librarian, MacEwan University


Thursday August 2, 2018 1:30pm - 4:30pm
MET:225

1:30pm

WT11 Structural Biology: A Prototypical Case for Publishing Big Data
WT11 Structural Biology: A Prototypical Case for Publishing Big Data
Course Chairs: Gustavo Durand, Technical Lead/Architect, Dataverse, The Institute for Quantitative Social Science, Harvard University
Instructor: Gustavo DurandTechnical Lead/Architect, Dataverse, The Institute for Quantitative Social Science, Harvard University; Pete Meyers, PhD, Research Computing Specialist, SBGrid Consortium, Harvard Medical School
Course Syllabus
Description: The general public, funding agencies and researchers are increasingly recognizing the significance of publishing biomedical research data. This process can improve research efficiency, and it is essential for reproducibility and validation of scientific research.
However, the characteristics of these datasets can present problems when it comes to  publishing them in a manner that is easily usable, citable and verifiable. In particular, biomedical datasets can require significant amounts of storage; can comprise several hundred to several thousand files; and need to be accessible to automated validation pipelines at multiple storage locations. The process of depositing, publishing and verifying datasets needs to be as efficient as possible for researchers operating under time and effort constraints.
This course will explore some of the currently existing platforms, from domain-specific repositories in structural biology and how they handle data deposition and validation to more general-purpose repositories and how they have shown to be a poor fit. We will discuss the students’ own experiences and also see if these problems are shared with other domains.
The course will then explore recent enhancements made to Dataverse, a data repository framework to share and publish research data, in order to support these processes. These enhancements include depositing big datasets comprising tens to hundreds of gigabytes, ensuring the integrity of these datasets via checksum algorithms and replicating datasets close to compute resources.
The instructors will also address how design decisions made during this process could impact use in other domains. Lastly, the class will discuss what big-data repositories of the future should look like.
The course will combine lectures and hands-on work to walk participants through the process of depositing and publishing datasets with this framework. At the end of this course, each participant should have a clear understanding of the benefits and pitfalls of working with big data and direct user experience with Dataverse’s approach to addressing these challenges.

Instructor | Speaker
avatar for Gustavo Durand

Gustavo Durand

Dataverse Technical Lead, Harvard University
PM

Pete Meyers, PhD

Research Computing Specialist, Harvard Medical School - SBGrid Consortium


Thursday August 2, 2018 1:30pm - 4:30pm
MET:313